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Archive: October, 2020
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  • Galveston District will be knocking on doors in Orange County to secure rights-of-entry

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) Galveston District, Real Estate Division will be going door-to-door in Orange County on Oct.15, 2020, to secure rights-of-entry from individual landowners in order to access property as part of the Sabine Pass to Galveston Bay, Texas Coastal Storm Risk Management (CSRM) and Ecosystem Restoration Project. The rights-of-entry are necessary to conduct various investigative activities (surveys, cultural resource investigations, geotechnical investigations). These investigative activities support the transition from conceptual designs to implementable project features and are necessary to continue to move conceptual designs forward to construction and these rights of entry are valid for up to 12 months. Landowners can specify that they want to be called before we access their property. USACE Galveston District personnel, and District-hired contractors, comply with those requests.
  • Corps awards $8.9M contract to AECOM HDR for design of Sabine to Galveston Freeport and Vicinity Project

    GALVESTON, Texas – The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) Galveston District awarded an $8,913,362.61 Architect-Engineer (AE) Task Order Sept. 30, to AECOM HDR Galveston JV, for design efforts of the Sabine to Galveston Freeport and Vicinity Coastal Storm Risk Management Project. The AE will provide a 35% design package for all contract areas of the Sabine to Galveston Freeport and Vicinity Coastal Storm Risk Management Project.
  • USACE Galveston District releases Buffalo Bayou Tributaries Resiliency Study Interim Report

    GALVESTON, Texas – Today the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) Galveston District is releasing an Interim Report for the Buffalo Bayou and Tributaries Resiliency Study (BBTRS). The purpose of BBTRS is to identify, evaluate and recommend actions to address conditions that have changed flood risks around the Addicks and Barker reservoirs since their construction in the 1940s.